RF Oregon Scientific version 1.0 Protocol Samples

A number of samples are available to help describe the protocol and structure of messages.

The version 1.0 preamble is shown below. The clock rate used to generate the x-axis was 342Hz. The integer values on the horizontal axis are aligned with the middle of each clock period.

Oregon Scientific RF Version 1.0 Preamble

Oregon Scientific RF Version 1.0 Preamble

Since the transmitted bit is equal to the RF state just before the middle of the clock period, this preamble consists of 12 “1” bits. These occur starting at zero on the labeled plot, and the transition defining the last preamble bit is at eleven.
The next graphic shows the sync portion of the RF message. The middle of the first clock period after the preamble is numbered “12” in this graphic. The sync interval runs from clock periods 12 through 15 in this case.

Sync Interval RF Oregon Scientific v 1.0

Sync Interval RF Oregon Scientific v 1.0

By the standards used in the rest of the RF message, this sync period is illegal because it has no RF transitions in the middle of each clock period. However, if we continue to sample the RF state just before the middle of each clock period, the sync portion of the message contains five bits – 0,1,1,0,0.
Clock alignment jumps slightly between the end of the sync period and the first data bit. Above, the transition which occurs just prior to the middle of clock period 17 is actually the middle of the first data clock period. It is not known why this apparent time shift exists.

The next figure shows the data portion of the message after the clock has been re-synchronized after the sync period. The middle of the clock period containing the first data bit is numbered zero.

Oregon Scientific RF Version 1.0 Data Payload (starting with "0")

Oregon Scientific RF Version 1.0 Data Payload (starting with "0")

It is clear that the length of the off period after the long sync pulse can have two different values. The shorter value occurs when the first data bit is a “1” and the longer value corresponds to a first data bit of “0”.

Recall that the RF pulse is off at the end of the sync period. There are two ways the data portion of the message can begin depending on the value of the first data bit.

If that bit is a zero, then the RF will remain off until the middle of the first clock period. Since there must be a transition in the middle of the clock period, the RF will need to go on at that point. This is the situation seen in figure 14. Obviously, that first pulse can either be long or short depending on the value of the second bit. In this case, the second bit is also zero so the pulse is a short one.

The next graphic shows the case where the first data bit is a “1”. In this case there is a transition prior to the middle of the first clock period. Since a transition is required at the middle of the clock period, this pulse must be a short one.

RF Oregon Scientific V1.0 Data Payload (starting with "1")

RF Oregon Scientific V1.0 Data Payload (starting with "1")

As mentioned above, and for unknown reasons, a clock synchronized with the preamble is slightly out of sync with the data portion of the message. The measured time from the end of the long sync pulse to the middle of the first data clock period is 6.68 milliseconds.

AGC Problems
In some receivers, the long RF-off time periods that occur during the sync interval of version 1.0 RF messages may cause problems with automatic gain control. If the receiver is designed to receive data at kilo-hertz rates, the AGC may start ramping up receiver gains during these long RF-off intervals. When the RF finally comes back on, the receiver may be over-loaded and the first few data bits will be corrupted until the AGC can recover.
This problem can be solved if the AGC circuits are locked down (frozen) at some point during the preamble of a version 1.0 RF message and unlocked after the message ends. This is the technique used with the WSDL WxShield to receive version 1.0 messages.

This entry was posted in 433.92 MHz, Arduino, oregon scientific rf protocols, Projects, RF and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.